#2BillionCare – do you?

Two billion people live in the drylands, which cover 41 percent of the world’s land area. Far from being bare and lifeless, these drylands contain trees and forests essential to the lives of people and animals, supplying basic needs such as food, medicine, wood, energy, and fodder for livestock. But every minute, we lose 23 hectares of land to desertification. Restoring these lands will return life to the soil and to the communities who know them best and depend on them for their livelihoods. As new trees and plants grow, transforming drylands into greener landscapes, they will help combat climate change, desertification and contribute to humanity’s efforts to save the planet. Help raise awareness on the importance of the world’s dryland forest

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International Day of Forests 2016

Forests are vital to our water supply. They influence how and where rain falls, and they filter and clean our water. By protecting the world’s forests, we are also protecting the clean water that we depend upon for our survival. Join us in celebrating the International Day of Forests on 21 March: Follow #UNFAO on social media! * Facebook – https:// * Google+ – https://plus.google.com/+UNFAO * Instagram – https://instagram.com/unfao/ * LinkedIn – https:// * Twitter – © FAO:

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Using Nuclear Science in the Control of Avian Influenza

Outbreaks of avian influenza have led to the death or culling of millions of poultry and pigs and untold millions of dollars in losses to farmers and producers. Avian influenza is also a deadly disease that affects humans. Through the use of isotopic techniques to track migrating birds, and molecular techniques to detect the presence of viruses, researchers and veterinary services will have a head start in predicting sites at higher risk of outbreaks. More information on: https:// Subscribe for more videos: Follow IAEA on social media: Facebook – https:// Twitter – https://twitter.com/iaeaorg Google+ – https://plus.google.com/+iaea Instagram – https:// LinkedIn – https://www.

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FAO’s work on protecting, saving & restoring agricultural livelihoods

Today, there are 795 million hungry people in the world. Food is a basic human right, yet this right is violated every day. The magnitude and impact of crises and disasters is increasing. The poorest and hungry are less able to absorb, recover and adapt. 75 % of the poorest populations rely on agriculture for their food and income. Livelihoods that depend on agriculture are on the front line of protracted crises, food chain emergencies and natural hazards and climate-related disasters. When a climate-related disaster strikes, 25 % of the total damage and losses are absorbed by the agriculture sector. Protecting, saving & restoring agricultural livelihoods is central to FAO’s work around the world. We must take action in 4 areas: govern crises and disaster risk, early warning for early a

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Using Nuclear Science to Manage Nitrogen

While nitrogen is the key component of all agricultural production systems, if used inappropriately, it can pollute waters, lead to greenhouse gas emission and further accelerate climate change. The ability to trace nitrogen as it moves through agricultural ecosystems is therefore essential to maximize its use while protecting the environment. Nitrogen-15, a stable isotope of nitrogen, is an ideal tracer. It can be easily measured in soils, plants, water and air to ensure that agricultural practises are environmentally sustainable and that farmers can minimise the quantity they apply. More information on: https:// Subscribe for more videos: Follow IAEA on social media: Facebook – https:// Twitter – ht

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